Growing plans

The Scottish Ministers recently published a consultation paper on proposals to strengthen the Scottish Planning System to help support sustainable economic growth.
The Ministers had previously appointed an independent panel and in May of last year that panel published its report: the recent paper is part of the response and ongoing consultation.
The proposals are wide-ranging, but specific aspects of the existing system have been identified as requiring reform, including removing the “strategic development plans” and making significant changes to the local development plans. A major focus is on putting measures in place to increase community involvement in proposed developments, while trying to impose as much of the cost of this as possible on to the development companies.
There are also suggestions to councils of ways to speed up development to meet demand, including making more publicly owned land available for development.
In line with other legislative changes, another major element of the proposals is to increase transparency when it come to infrastructure funding. There is a general proposal to allow for an infrastructure tax for Scotland, with income collected at the local authority level.
There is also focus on the costs involved in the planning system itself, with the Ministers indicating that the goal should be to make the system self sustainable, with mechanisms in place to allow it to recover its own costs.  This will be achieved by allowing for higher fees for applications, charging for appeals and allowing for fast-tracked applications in exchange for higher fees.
The consultation paper is at this stage quite high-concept, and vague on the detail of how the goals will be arrived at.  However, developers and other stakeholders will need to be aware of the proposals and the ongoing consultation process which will inevitably flesh things out.